Whole Grain French Artisan Bread (Pain aux Céréales)

Chanie Kaminker Recipe By
  • Cook & Prep: 3 h
  • Serving: 6
  • Contains:

Recipe by Chanie Kaminker.

Ingredients (5)

Main ingredients

Start Cooking

Prepare the Bread

  1. In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt, and sugar by hand. Create a well in the center by moving the ingredients to the sides of the bowl.

  2. Add the yeast into the well and pour one cup of lukewarm water over the yeast.

  3. Sprinkle one tablespoon of flour over the water. Wait for bubbles to appear in the yeast-water mixture, about 10 minutes.

  4. Begin kneading ingredients together to form a dough (this is best done by hand) by gradually incorporating the flour from the sides into the water in the middle. If the dough is too sticky, add a bit more flour at the end.

  5. Add one cup of mixed seeds and continue kneading until seeds are evenly dispersed. A round, firm ball of dough should result.

  6. Remove the dough from the bowl and transfer onto a lightly floured surface. Knead by pushing your palms into the dough and rotating it until dough is non-sticky, approximately 5-10 minutes.

  7. Place dough in a lightly floured bowl and cover with a damp cloth. Allow to rise for one hour. Dough should double in size.

  8. Lightly grease and flour a baking pan. Remove dough from bowl and punch down with your palms, and then reshape it into a ball. Roll the top and sides with remaining seeds. Place ball on baking pan and rise an additional one hour.

  9. Bake for 30 minutes in an oven preheated to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

Note:

When using a substantial amount of flour to make this recipe, please remember to do hafrashat challah.

Tip:

Want to know if you’ve kneaded your dough enough?

Take a small piece of dough and stretch it so it resembles a windowpane glass. When the gluten is developed properly, the dough should be able to stretch without breaking (this doesn’t work as well with whole wheat dough but should still be able to give you a good indication).

Want to know if your dough rose properly?

Poke your finger into it, about one-quarter to three-eighths of an inch. If the dough pushes back out very slowly, you have a properly risen dough.

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